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I FINALLY SWITCHED TO USING MENSTRUAL CUPS
Health and Fitness,  Lifestyle

READ: I Finally Switched to Using Menstrual Cups| Here’s Why You Should Too

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I don’t want to sound like a hypocrite and claim I’m living sustainably 100%, but I do try what I can to somehow lessen the waste that I produce as a person. It all started with metal straws, then not asking for bags when shopping, then cloth pantyliner and reusable cotton pads. Until I finally mustered enough courage to try what I’m curious, but fearful of the most.

Menstrual Cups

Continue reading to learn more about using menstrual cups and why I’m a convert.

 

What is a Menstrual Cup?

It is a  small, flexible cup is made of silicone or latex rubber. Instead of absorbing your flow, like a tampon or pad, it catches and collects it.

How do I know which Menstrual Cup is right for me?

You can answer this assessment test

How long does a menstrual cup last?

How long should a menstrual cup last? As long as you keep it clean regularly, menstrual cups can last for up to 10 years. You should replace yours if it has any tears, holes, or just isn’t in good condition anymore.

Source: https://store.lunette.com/blogs/news/8-faq-about-menstrual-cups

 

What brand do you use?

There are already a lot of brands of menstrual cups available in the market today. I just happen to find my luck on getting the perfect size and fit at Anytime Menstrual Cup.

 

5 Reasons Why I Switched to Using Menstrual Cups

I’m a regular tampon user through and through. I love how it’s not as leaky as napkins, and it uses less plastic (Veeda), but it also poses risks of toxic shock syndrome. Here are 5 reasons why I’m a convert to using menstrual cups.

  1. It’s eco- and wallet-friendly. A reusable cup can last up to 10 years. That means less waste in landfills and less money over time.
  2. You can leave it in for 12 hours. Tampons need to be changed every 4 to 8 hours, depending on your flow. But cups can stay in longer, so they’re good for overnight protection. And once you get the hang of inserting it, there’s no need to wear a backup pad or liner.
  3. It holds more. A menstrual cup can hold 1 ounce of liquid, roughly twice the amount of a super-absorbent tampon or pad. The difference can be a comfort on your heavy flow days.
  4. There’s less odor. Menstrual blood can start to smell when it’s exposed to air. But your cup forms an airtight seal.
  5. It’s safe. Experts say it’s safer than a tampon, because it has a lower risk of toxic shock syndrome, a bacterial infection. And compared with a pad, there’s no chance of chafing or rash.

Cons It takes a longer learning curve to get used to wearing a menstrual cup. Even moreso if you’re a virgin. It feels weird to be putting a huge chunk of plastic in our precious part.

My boyfriend was shocked when I showed him the menstrual cup (LOL Men!). He couldn’t believe it can fit comfortably inside! I told him that we give birth to even bigger babies so it’s piece of cake. 

Cleaning can be annoying too. I wash it with soap and water after every use and boil it for a few minutes. BUT even so, there’s still a bit of fishy smell that stays on the silicone. 

How to get rid of that fishy smell in menstrual cups?

Dipping it in lemon juice for about an hour, and then drying it out in the natural sunshine.

 

How to Put on a Menstrual Cup?

You fold it like so, and then insert it in your vagina. You need to be aware of how your muscles are contracted, and it’s best if they’re relaxed. Here’s an animated GIF and even a Youtube video as better guides:

 

Thank you for reading my blog post! If you have any questions on using a menstrual cup feel free to leave a comment below and I’ll try my best to answer 🙂

 

 

 

 

 

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